From Today’s Cantonese Press

Justice secretary supports the presence of non-Chinese judges

Yesterday, Alan Hoo, Chairman of the Basic Law Institute, at a seminar on the Basic Law, said that Hong Kong people should administer Hong Kong across all governance areas. He also said that Hong Kong did not have enough Chinese judges. Regarding this suggestion, Justice Secretary Yuen Kwok-keung has provided a rare rebuttal, saying that any suggestion to limit foreign judges could greatly limit the perspectives of judges overall. He also said that foreign judges enhance the reputation of Hong Kong’s legal organizations and help maintain a connection with other common law jurisdictions.

 

ICAC to hear appeal of prosecutors against Stephen Chan

Yesterday, the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) began its appeal against the acquittal of former TVB General Manager Stephen Chan and his former assistant for corruption charges. Prosecutors had alleged that Chan had illegally received payment for hosting a talk show on the station that he managed, but Chan was acquitted on the grounds that he had a reasonable belief that his actions would be allowed if he attended in the capacity of a celebrity instead of as a TV station manager. Chan’s lawyer also believes that Chan’s actions were beneficial for TVB. Justice Wally Yeung Chun-kuen, Vice-President of the Court of Appeal, claims that the former judge made a false ruling. He said that if Chan’s defense were accepted, anyone could receive a reward by saying that their action was beneficial to their principal.

 

ICAC calls for a HK$100 million investigation

The corruption case against Former Chief Secretary for Administration Raphael Hui and co-chairmen of the Sun Hong Kai property group Thomas and Raymond Kwok will soon be heard by the High Court. The Department of Justice and the ICAC have requested that LegCo make an allocation for a special investigator for what they have called the largest corruption case in local history. The investigation might cost up to HK$100 million.

 

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